Saturday, March 26, 2011

Are you Called to Writing?

During a recent discussion the question came up whether writers should view writing as a calling. If you are crafting words merely as a way to make lots of money, then your writing may not be a calling. That's not to say you won't ever make money as a writer, but what is your primary purpose in writing? If it is to become rich, then you may view writing as a way to support you and your family. If you write to share your faith or help others strengthen their faith, your writing focus has a spiritual focus .

In that case, if you are called to write and fail to write that for which you are called and gifted, are you not a little like Jonah? Jonah was called to take the word of God to Nineveh, but kept getting side-tracked. God had a plan for what he wanted Jonah to tell the Ninevites. Someone may need to read that story you keep putting off until a better time comes round. Your story may not make the New York Times bestseller list, but your story may make a difference in another person's life. What you wrote even make a difference in your own life.

You'll never find out until you place yourself before a keyboard and start typing.




2 comments:

Nissa Annakindt said...

Just because one hopes to receive money from one's writing doesn't mean one is writing 'to become rich'.

After all, the rag-picker gets money when he rag-picks and the plumber when he plumbs, but that doesn't make their vocation any less authentic since they are not doing it for free.

Writing to share your faith? I've read too many books by authors both secular and Christian who want to share their point of view, and that attitude just gets in the way of things and makes their work preachy (and there is nothing worse than a preachy atheist).

Fantasythyme said...

Thanks, Nissa. You raise a good point about writing with the expectation of getting paid.

I've read books like the ones you mention. A preachy, condescending tone in books work against the story the author is attempting to tell; no matter what the intended message.